THE HAIRDRESSER

THE HAIRDRERSSER By Julia French

I saw a little girl skipping through my dreams last night.

She was wearing cut off blue jean shorts and tennis shoes as she skipped down the center of the Mall without a care. Her pigtails were pulled tight but were hardly straight. One was high and one was low as though she’d been tugging on them all day long. Her mouth was full of gum; maybe five pieces filled her cheeks. In her opinion, five pieces was just the right amount of gum for the best bubbles, and she was working on a huge one as she skipped passed Mall shops.

When she came to the entrance of the hair salon, the hairdresser at the desk waved her inside.

“Come on in here darling, and sit in my chair. I’ll fix you right up.”

The little girl skipped to the twirly chair, hopped up as directed and snuggled back into the chair arms securely. She then looked up into the hairdresser’s concerned face.

“Does something need fix’in on me?”

The hairdresser’s eyes sparkled at her question. He pulled a few hitchhikers from her shirt as he thought about her words. Then he noticed the tag of her shirt sticking out underneath her chin.

“Did you dress yourself this morning darling?”

“Sure did, Mom said I could put on whatever I wanted cause it’s Saturday.” She grinned proudly.

He touched her sunburned cheeks and wrapped one of her pigtails around his hand with a little chuckle.

“Where’s your mother?”

“Home”

“Where have you been playing?”

“Everywhere”

The hairdresser then gave the girl a little nudge, “Go on… scoot… I can’t think of a thing that needs fix’in on you, darling. Go tell your mother, I’ll be home for dinner at 6 tonight.”

“Not everything needs fix’in all the time, hu, Daddy.” The little girl said as she scrambled from the chair.

         “That’s right darling, some things don’t need fix’in all the time. They are perfect just as they are.” He gave her butt a quick pat as she galloped off home.

 ******

In the world we live in today we are often trained to see, “what’s wrong” “what needs changing” “what needs fix’in” In the above story I’m sure that you can find many things that “should be” corrected. But can you see what “should be” left alone?

Modern day professional companies depend on their employee’s ability to locate errors in products or hazards to production. No matter what profession you are in, law enforcement, carpentry, medicine, school teacher, secretary, gas station attendant, you name it, it doesn’t really matter what profession you are in, part of your job is catching mistakes and fixing them in some form or another.

As much as we do need to spot problems and fix them, strive for perfection and all of that….. Sometimes just to stop and enjoy humanity in all its imperfection is a very liberating and heartwarming experience.

Take the hairdresser Dad for example. I’m sure he ached to straighten out his daughter’s pigtails. He was trained to notice hair and fix it up nice. It was his job and he wouldn’t be any good at his job if he wasn’t able spot hair problems and fix them. But she was happy the way she was. In all her imperfection, she was Daddy’s adorable little girl. The Dad was able to stop his job, “stop fixing up” for just long enough to partake of who his daughter was at that precise moment in time. He held off on complaining about her backwards shirt, her messed up piggy tails, her mouth full of way too much gum. All those things probably bugged him a bit, don’t ya think? But he held off on the complaining about them, instead he decided to notice her happy smile, to notice that she’d figured out how to skip, he’d not seen her do that before. If we take time to train our eyes to see the good things around us, what do you think we’d see?

Not everything needs fixing up all the time. Some things are best enjoyed just the way they are, imperfect and beautiful.

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Thoughts of the Day and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to THE HAIRDRESSER

  1. Helma Calcaben says:

    I did not know that you can write. Keep writing! I am blessed reading them.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s